As of Sep. 25th, we're $6,900 in the red for 2017. Please donate here to support this vital work.
Subscribe here to our free email list

GAO Annual Report:
U.S. Government Finances a Mess


"Until the problems discussed in GAO's audit report on the U.S. government's consolidated financial statements are adequately addressed, they will...hinder the federal government from having reliable financial information to operate in an economical, efficient, and effective manner. The federal government's fiscal exposures now total more than $46 trillion, representing close to four times gross domestic product (GDP) in fiscal year 2005 and up from about $20 trillion...in 2000."
  -- Government Accountability Office (GAO) website posting of 2005 annual audit, 2/3/05

April 11, 2006

Dear friends,

The below 2005 annual fiscal report published by the highly respected Government Accountability Office (GAO) is undeniably one of the most neglected news stories of the year. I invite you to try to find this shocking news on any mainstream media website. Tasked by Congress with providing accurate accounting of all aspects of U.S. government finances, the GAO has not been able to satisfactorily complete its evaluation of how effectively our tax dollars are being used for nine consecutive years due to serious management problems at various U.S. government agencies, most notably the Pentagon.

For a highly revealing CBS news article describing how the Pentagon "cannot track $2.3 trillion in transactions:" http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/01/29/eveningnews/main325985.shtml. That's $8,000 for every man, woman and child in America—2.3 trillion of our tax dollars which no one can account for. So why isn't this in the front page headlines? See https://www.WantToKnow.info/mediacorruption for a possible answer. Thanks to the amazing power of the Internet, you can help play the role at which the media is so sadly failing by spreading this critical news to your friends and colleagues. Let us insist that we be informed of how our tax dollars are being used. Take care and remember that together, we can and will build a brighter future.

With best wishes,
Fred Burks for WantToKnow.info
Former language interpreter for Presidents Bush and Clinton

http://www.gao.gov/highlights/d06406thigh.pdf - Official .pdf version of 2005 report summary on GAO website
http://www.gao.gov/docsearch/abstract.php?rptno=GAO-06-406T - Text version of summary

Fiscal Year 2005 U.S. Government Financial Statement

Sustained Improvement in Federal Financial Management Is Crucial to Addressing Our Nation's Financial Condition and Long-term Fiscal Imbalance

GAO is required by law to annually audit the consolidated financial statements of the U.S. government. The Congress and the President need to have timely, reliable, and useful financial and performance information. Sound decisions on the current results and future direction of vital federal government programs and policies are made more difficult without such information.

Until the problems discussed in GAO's audit report on the U.S. government's consolidated financial statements are adequately addressed, they will continue to (1) hamper the federal government's ability to reliably report a significant portion of its assets, liabilities, costs, and other information; (2) affect the federal government's ability to reliably measure the full cost as well as the financial and nonfinancial performance of certain programs and activities; (3) impair the federal government's ability to adequately safeguard significant assets and properly record various transactions; and (4) hinder the federal government from having reliable financial information to operate in an economical, efficient, and effective manner.

What GAO Found

For the ninth consecutive year, certain material weaknesses in internal control and in selected accounting and financial reporting practices resulted in conditions that continued to prevent GAO from being able to provide the Congress and American people an opinion as to whether the consolidated financial statements of the U.S. government are fairly stated in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

Three major impediments to an opinion on the consolidated financial statements continued to be (1) serious financial management problems at the Department of Defense, (2) the federal government's inability to adequately account for and reconcile intragovernmental activity and balances between federal agencies, and (3) the federal government's ineffective process for preparing the consolidated financial statements. Further, in our opinion, as of September 30, 2005, the federal government did not maintain effective internal control over financial reporting and compliance with significant laws and regulations due to numerous material weaknesses.

More troubling still is the federal government's overall financial condition and long-term fiscal imbalance. While the fiscal year 2005 budget deficit was lower than 2004, it was still very high, especially given the impending retirement of the "baby boom" generation and rising health care costs. Importantly, as reported in the fiscal year 2005 Financial Report of the United States Government, the federal government's accrual-based net operating cost--the cost to operate the federal government--increased to $760 billion in fiscal year 2005 from $616 billion in fiscal year 2004. This represents an increase of about $144 billion or 23 percent. The federal government's gross debt was about $8 trillion as of September 30, 2005. This number excludes such items as the gap between the present value of future promised and funded Social Security and Medicare benefits, veterans' health care, and a range of other liabilities, commitments, and contingencies that the federal government has pledged to support.

Including these items, the federal government's fiscal exposures now total more than $46 trillion, representing close to four times gross domestic product (GDP) in fiscal year 2005 and up from about $20 trillion or two times GDP in 2000. Given these and other factors, a fundamental reexamination of major spending programs, tax policies, and government priorities will be important and necessary to put us on a prudent and sustainable fiscal path. This will likely require a national discussion about what Americans want from their government and how much they are willing to pay for those things.

We continue to have concerns about the identification of misstatements in federal agencies' prior year financial statements. Frequent restatements to correct errors can undermine public trust and confidence in both the entity and all responsible parties. The material internal control weaknesses discussed in this testimony serve to increase the risk that additional errors may occur and not be identified on a timely basis by agency management or their auditors, resulting in further restatements.

Note: For the full 20-page GAO report on the sad state of U.S. government finances:
http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d06406t.pdf - Official .pdf version on the GAO website
http://www.gao.gov/htext/d06406t.html - Text-only version

Finding Balance: WantToKnow.info Inspiration Center

WantToKnow.info believes it is important to balance disturbing cover-up information with inspirational writings which call us to be all that we can be and to work together for positive change. For an abundance of uplifting material, please visit our Inspiration Center.

See our exceptional archive of revealing news articles.

Please support this important work: Donate here

Explore the mind and heart expanding websites managed by the nonprofit PEERS network:
www.peerservice.org - PEERS websites: Spreading inspiration, education, & empowerment
www.momentoflove.org - Every person in the world has a heart
www.personalgrowthcourses.net - Dynamic online courses powerfully expand your horizons
www.WantToKnow.info - Reliable, verifiable information on major cover-ups
www.weboflove.org - Strengthening the Web of Love that interconnects us all

Subscribe/Unsubscribe/Change email address: The WantToKnow.info email list (two messages a week)

GAO Annual Report of U.S. Government Finances