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Voting Machines Can Be Hacked
Diebold CEO Resigns


"Diebold, the controversial electronic voting machine manufacturer, is coming off a tumultuous week. Its chief executive, Walden O'Dell, resigned. It was hit with a pair of class-action lawsuits charging insider trading and misrepresentation, and a county in Florida concluded that Diebold's voting machines could be hacked. The company...reached a multimillion-dollar settlement with the California attorney general last year of a lawsuit alleging that it made false claims about the security of its machines."
  -- New York Times, 12/18/05

Dear friends,

Election fraud has surfaced in a number of major media publications. The one-paragraph summaries of several of these articles below demonstrate that there are serious problems with our electoral system which have yet to be addressed. For an abundance of excellent, verifiable information revealing major cover-ups and election fraud dealing with elections, see our information-packed Elections Information Center at https://www.WantToKnow.info/electionsinformation. By working together to spread the word, we can and will strengthen democracy and build a better world for all.

With best wishes,
Fred Burks for WantToKnow.info
Former language interpreter for Presidents Bush and Clinton

O'Dell resigns from voting machine maker Diebold
December 14 , 2005, USA Today/Associated Press

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/2005-12-14-diebold-odell_x.htm

The chairman and chief executive of automated-teller and voting machine maker Diebold quit on Monday. The company, which has come under fire for its electronic voting business, said in a statement that the resignation of 60-year-old Walden W. O'Dell is effective immediately. Diebold, whose main business is making ATMs and security systems, ventured into e-voting after the Florida punch-card debacle of 2000. The company faced challenges in the e-voting business – from concerns from California's top election official and others about the machines' security and reliability to controversy about O'Dell's support of President Bush.

County says electronic voting machines can be hacked
December 15, 2005, USA Today/Associated Press

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2005-12-15-opticalvoting_x.htm

Tests on an optical-scan voting system used around the country showed it is vulnerable to hacking that can change the outcome of races without leaving evidence of fraud, a county election supervisor said. The voting system maker, Diebold Inc., sent a letter in response that questioned the test results and said the test was "a very foolish and irresponsible act" that may [have] violated licensing agreements. Diebold's letter was...sent to the state of Florida, Leon County and the county election supervisor, Ion Sancho. In one of the tests conducted for Sancho and the non-profit election-monitoring group BlackBoxVoting.org, the researchers were able to get into the system easily, make the loser the winner and leave without a trace. In the other test, the researcher who had hacked into the voting machine's memory card was able to hide votes, make losers out of winners and leave no trace of the changes, said BlackBox founder Bev Harris.

New tests fuel doubts about vote machines
December 15 , 2005, Miami Herald

http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/state/13410061.htm

A political operative with hacking skills could alter the results of any election on Diebold-made voting machines -- and possibly other new voting systems in Florida -- according to the state capital's election supervisor, who said Diebold software has failed repeated tests. ''That's kind of scary. If there's no paper trail, you have to rely solely on electronic results. And now we know that they can be manipulated under the right conditions, without a person even leaving a fingerprint,'' said Sancho, who once headed the state's elections supervisors association. Sancho said Diebold isn't the only one to blame for hacker-prone equipment. The Florida secretary of state's office should have caught these problems early on, he said. A spokeswoman for the secretary of state's office said any faults Sancho found were between him and Diebold. A nonprofit election-monitoring group called BlackBoxVoting.org...hired Herbert Thompson, a computer-science professor and strategist at Security Innovation, which tests software for companies such as Google and Microsoft. Thompson told The Herald he was ''shocked'' at how easy it was to get in, make the loser the winner and leave without a trace. He typed five lines of computer code -- and switched 5,000 votes from one candidate to another.''I am positive an eighth grader could do this,'' Thompson said.

Diebold sued by investors
December 16, 2005, Boston Globe/Associated Press

http://www.boston.com/news/local/connecticut/articles/2005/12/16/diebold_sued_by_investors_1134750850/

Two law firms representing investors are suing Diebold Inc., claiming the Ohio company made misleading comments about its electronic voting machine business that led to artificially high share prices. The lawsuits filed this week in U.S. District Court in Cleveland claim Diebold was "unable to assure the quality and working order of its voting machine products." The plaintiff claims the company tried to conceal the problems from investors. Both lawsuits seek class-action status. Both firms allege that Diebold violated federal securities laws by making misleading statements about the health of its voting machine business, causing Diebold stock to artificially rise. The resignation came after several years of controversy surrounding the security and reliability of Diebold's touch-screen voting machines and O'Dell's ties to President Bush. Besides concerns about security and reliability of the touch-screens, O'Dell was criticized in 2003 when he invited people to a fundraiser for Bush with a letter stating he planned to help "Ohio deliver its electoral votes to the president." Ohio turned out to be the state that clinched Bush's re-election in 2004.

The Business of Voting
December 18 , 2005, New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/18/opinion/18sun2.html

Diebold, the controversial electronic voting machine manufacturer, is coming off a tumultuous week. Its chief executive, Walden O'Dell, resigned. It was hit with a pair of class-action lawsuits charging insider trading and misrepresentation, and a county in Florida concluded that Diebold's voting machines could be hacked. The counting of votes is a public trust. Diebold, whose machines count many votes, has never acted as if it understood this. Mr. O'Dell made national headlines when he wrote a fund-raising letter before the 2004 election expressing his commitment to help deliver the electoral votes of Ohio - where Diebold is based, and where its machines are used - to President Bush. Under pressure, Diebold barred its top officials from contributing to campaigns. But this month, The Plain Dealer in Cleveland reported that three executives not covered by the ban continued to make contributions. Diebold's voting machines have a troubled history. The company was accused of installing improperly certified software, which is illegal, in a 2002 governor's race in Georgia. Across the country, it reached a multimillion-dollar settlement with the California attorney general last year of a lawsuit alleging that it made false claims about the security of its machines.

Note: Kevin Shelley, the California attorney general mentioned here, was eventually forced out of office by an aggressive media campaign accusing him of things we know are done by almost all politicians. For reliable information on this, see https://www.WantToKnow.info/050207kevinshelleysresignation.

State wants more tests of voting machines
Diebold's electronic systems shown vulnerable to hackers

December 21, 2005, San Francisco Chronicle

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2005/12/21/BAGG1GB3QE22.DTL

A controversial electronic voting system must undergo federal security testing before it can be approved for use in California, Secretary of State Bruce McPherson said Tuesday. Diebold Election System's optical scan and touch-screen voting systems...will have their state certification delayed for the second time, McPherson said. "We have determined that there is sufficient cause for additional federal evaluation,'' he said in a statement. "Unresolved significant security concerns exist with respect to the memory card" because the federal government never reviewed the software that programs the card, said Caren Daniels-Meade, head of the secretary of state's election division, in a letter to Diebold. "We strongly believe it is the duty and responsibility of the secretary of state and you to make sure that the ultimate users of your products -- the voters of California -- have a voting system that has been thoroughly and rigorously evaluated.'' Diebold officials declined to comment directly on McPherson's concerns. The secretary of state first refused to certify the Diebold systems in July, after 20 percent of the new, printer-equipped electronic voting machines malfunctioned during a test in San Joaquin County.

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