As of February 18, we're $15,900 in the red for the quarter. Donate here to support this vital work
Subscribe here and join the 13,823 subscribers to our free weekly newsletter

7 countries where Americans can study at universities, in English, for free (or almost free)
Key Excerpts from Article on Website of Washington Post Blog


Washington Post Blog, October 29, 2014
Posted: January 4th, 2015
http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2014/10/29...

Since 1985, U.S. college costs have surged by about 500 percent, and tuition fees keep rising. In Germany, they've done the opposite. The country's universities have been tuition-free since the beginning of October. Tuition rates were always low in Germany, but now the German government fully funds the education of its citizens -- and even of foreigners. Explaining the change, Dorothee Stapelfeldt, a senator in the northern city of Hamburg, said tuition fees "discourage young people who do not have a traditional academic family background from taking up study." Germany's higher education landscape primarily consists of internationally well-ranked public universities, some of which receive special funding because the government deems them "excellent institutions." What's more, Americans can earn a German undergraduate or graduate degree without speaking a word of German and without having to pay a single dollar of tuition fees: About 900 undergraduate or graduate degrees are offered exclusively in English, with courses ranging from engineering to social sciences. For some German degrees, you don't even have to formally apply. The vast degree offerings in English are intended to prepare German students to communicate in a foreign language, but also to attract foreign students, because the country needs more skilled workers.

Note: This clearly shows which countries place a high priority on the education of their citizens. Along with Germany, the article discusses Finland, France, Sweden, Norway, Slovenia, and Brazil.


Top Inspiring News Articles


Top Inspiring News Articles from Years Past